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Durham e-Theses
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A study of Frederick William Faber’s hymns on the four last things in the context of his hymnody as presented in the collection of 1861

Pratt, Andrew Edward (1997) A study of Frederick William Faber’s hymns on the four last things in the context of his hymnody as presented in the collection of 1861. Masters thesis, Durham University.

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Abstract

This thesis is a study of Frederick William Faber's hymns on the four last things as they are presented in the collection of 1861.The study provides an outline of Faber's biography and his spiritual pilgrimage. It takes note of the events leading up to his conversion to Roman Catholicism and deals briefly with the establishment of the London Oratory. The collection of hymns is studied as a whole, so that the place of those hymns on the four last things can be better understood. Reference is made to Faber's cultural and theological context, and that in which he ministered, which are seen to have formed his approach to hymnody and defined the structure of his collection. An assessment is made of the hymns in their historical context. An indication is given as to the degree to which Faber achieved the aims which he set for himself Comment is made on the lasting value of his hymns on the four last things. Faber’s greatest skill is perceived to be in illustrating and giving expression to the range of human emotions consequent on bereavement. In this way he provides a vehicle which has been used to enable others to respond to their own experiences, which is still valuable today.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Award:Master of Arts
Thesis Date:1997
Copyright:Copyright of this thesis is held by the author
Deposited On:09 Oct 2012 11:45

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