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Durham e-Theses
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Exchange networks in southeast Arabia in the
Early Bronze Age (c.3200-2000 B.C.):An Analysis of Changing Patterns of Exchange in the Hafit and Umm an-Nar Periods

EDDISFORD, DANIEL,MORGAN (2020) Exchange networks in southeast Arabia in the
Early Bronze Age (c.3200-2000 B.C.):An Analysis of Changing Patterns of Exchange in the Hafit and Umm an-Nar Periods.
Doctoral thesis, Durham University.

Full text not available from this repository.
Author-imposed embargo until 13 November 2023.

Abstract

The Bronze Age is a time of dramatic change for the societies of SE Arabia, with local cultures and styles developing against a backdrop of state formation in Mesopotamia and the Indus region. For the first time the archaeological evidence is supplemented by Mesopotamian texts that describe trade relations with neighbouring regions that included Dilmun (Bahrain), Magan (SE Arabia) and Meluhha (the Indus region). This thesis explores the nature of Early Bronze Age (c.3200-2000 B.C.) trade networks in SE Arabia, how these changed over time and the impact these changes may have had on local socio-economic and political structures. I provide a comprehensive investigation of published archaeological sites, supplemented by an analysis of an unpublished ceramic assemblage from the site of Kalba 4. I draw from economic theory in anthropology and archaeology to query existing models of social organisation in the region.

Item Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Award:Doctor of Philosophy
Keywords:Exchange, Arabia, Bronze Age, Hafit, Umm an-Nar, Trade, Archaeology, Magan
Faculty and Department:Faculty of Social Sciences and Health > Archaeology, Department of
Thesis Date:2020
Copyright:Copyright of this thesis is held by the author
Deposited On:16 Nov 2020 13:31

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