Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse this repository, you give consent for essential cookies to be used. You can read more about our Privacy and Cookie Policy.


Durham e-Theses
You are in:

An investigation of the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) on academic self-concept and the social comparison types and standards among boys and girls in single-sex and co-educational schools in Jordan

ODAT, MARWAN,QASIM,MOHAMMAD (2016) An investigation of the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) on academic self-concept and the social comparison types and standards among boys and girls in single-sex and co-educational schools in Jordan. Doctoral thesis, Durham University.

Full text not available from this repository.
Author-imposed embargo until 10 February 2019.

Abstract

This is an embedded mixed methods research study aimed at examining the associations of gender and schooling type with the Big Fish Little Pond Effect (BFLPE) in four school subjects: Arabic, English, Science and Math in the context of Jordan. The BFLPE hypothesizes that academic self-concept is positively affected by individual academic ability but negatively affected by the average ability of a class or school. Students’ ability was measured by using an ability test from PISA 2000 (Programme for international student assessment). Students’ academic self-concepts were measured by the academic self-description questionnaire II (ASDQII). The types of social comparison made in the classroom were investigated using semi-structured interviews. The systematic multi-stage cluster sampling was used in selecting 269 tenth grade male and female students from single-sex and co-educational schools in the northern regions in Jordan. 8 male and female students were randomly selected to take part in face-to-face interviews. The results showed that male and female students in single-sex and co-educational schools in Jordan suffered the BFLPE. A student’s own ability has a positive effect on their academic self-concept, but the average ability of a school is evident in having a negative effect on students’ academic self-concept in the four subjects. Gender has no influence on the academic self-concept. The type of school a student attends has a substantial influence on academic self-concept. Students who attend co-educational schools suffered a larger BFLPE than their peers in single-sex schools. The interaction between gender and school type was not significant in any of the four subjects’ self-concept. The findings from the interviews evidenced the downward and upward comparisons. The effect of downward comparisons on academic self-concept was positive; whereas, the effect of upward comparisons on academic self-concept was negative. The findings from the interviews also showed different social comparison standards that students used to establish their academic self-concepts such school grades, the participation in the class, homework, and teachers’ and parents’ comments.

Item Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Award:Doctor of Education
Keywords:Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect, Academic self-concept, Social comparison theory
Faculty and Department:Faculty of Social Sciences and Health > Education, School of
Thesis Date:2016
Copyright:Copyright of this thesis is held by the author
Deposited On:24 Oct 2016 15:36

Social bookmarking: del.icio.usConnoteaBibSonomyCiteULikeFacebookTwitter