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Durham e-Theses
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Adverse Weather Conditions in Medieval Britain: An Archaeological Assessment of the Impact of Meteorological Hazards

BROWN, PETER,JAMES (2015) Adverse Weather Conditions in Medieval Britain: An Archaeological Assessment of the Impact of Meteorological Hazards. Masters thesis, Durham University.

Full text not available from this repository.
Author-imposed embargo until 30 July 2018.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY).

Abstract

The history of the medieval period in Britain is punctuated by catastrophic events, including wars, political unrest, disease, famine and ‘natural’ disasters. While archaeological evidence for warfare, epidemics and diet have seen extensive research within the sub-disciplines of battlefield/conflict archaeology and paleopathology, ‘natural’ disasters have not sparked comparable investigations. This research aims, to a limited extent, to redress this. As with other calamities, disasters caused by natural hazards have, over the longue-durée, influenced humanity’s regional social, economic and cultural development. This research therefore focuses on the multitude of impacts resulting from those hazards dependent on weather systems throughout the later British Middle Ages, defined here as AD c. 1000-c. 1550, analysing the different ways in which medieval populations responded to meteorological hazards through both physical and spiritual means using both archaeological and historical sources. The extent to which British medieval society adapted to the risk of natural hazards is also assessed.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Award:Master of Arts
Keywords:Natural Disasters, Medieval, Risk, Responses, Mitigation
Faculty and Department:Faculty of Social Sciences and Health > Archaeology, Department of
Thesis Date:2015
Copyright:Copyright of this thesis is held by the author
Deposited On:30 Jul 2015 15:42

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