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Durham e-Theses
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The fictional representation of the Napoleonic wars in selected nineteenth century authors

Mayhew, Jeffrey (1973) The fictional representation of the Napoleonic wars in selected nineteenth century authors. Masters thesis, Durham University.

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Abstract

An introduction delineates the scope of the thesis and summarises its findings in a comparative survey of the texts utilised in the study. Five chapters cover five selected authors who are represented by one or two of their works. The first chapter considers Erckmann-Chatrian's Waterloo with particular attention to its form as a first person account and as a work specifically imbued with anti-war sentiments. Firstly the political climate prior to the Waterloo campaigns as described in Waterloo is analysed and then the description of the actual campaigns. The second chapter traces the development of Stendhal's political ideas and of his attitude towards Napoleon, largely through his non-fictional writing. It then examines the Napoleonic legend, and the mal du siecle as portrayed in Le Rouge et le Noir and the Italian campaigns and Waterloo as described in La Chartreuse de Parme. Chapter three considers Balzac’s political ideas and his attitude towards Napoleon and then presents an analysis of Le Colonel. Chabert. including a close study of the battle of Eylau, and a survey of the Napoleonic element in Le Medecin de campagne. The fourth chapter traces Hardy's interest in history and the genesis and development of the ideas which resulted in The Trumpet- Manor and The Dynasts. The first is considered in its entirety and the second for its presentation of the battle of Waterloo. Lastly chapter five examines Tolstoy's interest in the period and in particular his ideas on history as expressed in the Epilogue to War and Peace. An examination of Tolstoy's presentation of the battle of Borodino concludes the chapter.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Award:Master of Arts
Thesis Date:1973
Copyright:Copyright of this thesis is held by the author
Deposited On:14 Mar 2014 16:47

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